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Dee Palmer - The Orchestral Sgt Pepper (CD)

Genre: Pop/Rock
Release Date: 4th December 2015

Label: Gonzo
Catalogue Number: HST304CD
Price: £9.99
Available: In stock


Dee Palmer - The Orchestral Sgt Pepper

In June 1967 four long haired musicians from Liverpool released a long playing record. The critic Kenneth Tynan described it as "a decisive moment in the history of Western civilisation". Richard Poirier wrote: "listening to the Sgt. Pepper album one thinks not simply of the history of popular music but the history of this century." Time magazine declared it "a historic departure in the progress of music – any music". Newsweek's Jack Kroll called it a "masterpiece", comparing the lyrics with literary works by Edith Sitwell, Harold Pinter and T. S. Eliot, particularly "A Day in the Life", which he compared to Eliot's The Waste Land. The New York Times Book Review characterised it as a harbinger of a "golden Renaissance of Song" and the New Statesman 's Wilfrid Mellers praised its elevation of pop music to the level of fine art.

A "decisive moment in the history of Western civilisation" huh?

Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band is the eighth studio album by the English rock band the Beatles. In August 1966, the Beatles permanently retired from touring and began a three-month holiday from recording. During a return flight to London in November, Paul McCartney had an idea for a song involving an Edwardian era military band that would eventually form the impetus of the Sgt. Pepper concept. Sessions for the Beatles' eighth studio album began on 24 November in Abbey Road Studio Two.

In February 1967, after recording "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band", McCartney suggested that the Beatles should release an entire album that would represent a performance by the fictional Sgt. Pepper band. This alter ego group would give them the freedom to experiment musically. During the recording sessions, the band endeavoured to improve upon the production quality of their prior releases. Knowing they would not have to perform the tracks live, they adopted an experimental approach to composition, writing songs such as "With a Little Help from My Friends", "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" and "A Day in the Life". The producer George Martin's innovative recording of the album included the liberal application of sound shaping signal processing and the use of a 40-piece orchestra performing aleatoric crescendos. Recording was completed on 21 April 1967. The cover, depicting the band posing in front of a tableau of celebrities and historical figures, was designed by the English pop artists Peter Blake and Jann Haworth based on a sketch by McCartney.

In 1994, Dee Palmer, possibly best known as hgaving been an innovative and exciting keyboard player with JHethro Tull orchestrated this classic album for EMI at the famous Abbey Road studios with the Royal Academy Of Music Symphony Orchestra, donating the lion’s share of the royalties for the benefit of  impecunious music students at the Royal Academy, having once been one himself.

A splendid wassname is guaranteed for all.


Tracks:

Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band

With a Little Help from My friends

Lucy In the Sky with Diamonds

Getting Better

Fixing a Hole 

She's Leaving Home

Being for the Benefit of Mr Kyte

When I'm Sixty Four

Lovely Rita

Sgt' Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band (reprise) 

A Day in the Life 

 



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