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Zenit - The Chandrasekhar Limit (CD)

Genre: Prog rock
Release Date: 28th January 2013

Label: Galileo Records
Catalogue Number: GLR112CD
Price: £9.99
Available: Sorry - Not currently available


Zenit - The Chandrasekhar Limit

Zenit was founded in Switzerland in 1998 by bass player Andy Thommen, keyboarder Ivo Bernasconi and drummer Gigio Pedruzzi, based on their wealth of experience with bands like Clepsydra, Changes and Brainstorm.

In 2001, now with the addition of singer Lorenzo Sonognini, Zenit released their debut album Pravritti, with Italian and English lyrics, followed by various inspiring live performances in relevant prog festivals. In 2006, with the addition of Luigi Biamino on guitars, the band released the second album called Surrender.

The song material is elaborate and ever so captivating and offers fans of Genesis, Marillion, Supertramp, Kansas or Gentle Giant an alternative without losing anything of what they favour in their preferred bands.

The production of Surrender is crisp and very much to the point, just everything necessary is there that makes sound on all tone diversity levels covering multiple musical desires great! In February 2013 the band released their third album The Chandrasekhar Limit (Galileo Records / Gonzo Media Group) with the new drummer Gabriele Schira.

On Zenit’s new album The Chandrasekhar Limit (69 minutes), Andy Thommen (formerly Clepsydra), affixes a seal with his distinctive bass play right from the start of the first song (Awaken). Later, with the start of the guitar, you will somewhat be reminded of the Clepsydra sound: awesome guitar-bass team play!

Here you start with what you expect to get from this brilliant album: quality. The marvellous long tracker Matrimandir (17 minutes), brings a breath of oriental sounds in a very subtle but delicate way without being brash, despite the Sanskrit lyrics now and then. One of the best long tracker of recent times clocking around 25 minutes, is The Daydream Suite that brings reminiscences of Pink Floyd and all the other stuff a prog suite should have: crazy keyboard solos, melodic guitar lines, cool bass parts and complex choirs, harmoniously in action. The rocking instrumental sound of Pulsar, the sweet and sinful ballad Cub Lady and the screaming-jazzy PiGreco song, jointly make up an impressive and progressive rock album of the 21st century.


Tracks:
1. Awaken
2. Cub Lady
3. PiGreco
4. Matrimandir
5. Pulsar
6. The Daydream Suite

 



 Review: DUTCH ZENIT REVIEW


Zenith
Remains of a white dwarf star or a star becomes a black hole? For the Swiss prog rock formation Zenit was unclear where they would evolve with 'The Chandrasekhar Limit' go - hence the title. The astronomical zenith may be different for each observer, but one thing is certain: this third album is the most ambitious of the Alps Band.
Founded in 1998 on the ashes of Clepsydra, Changes and Brainstorm, Zenit is a combination of progressive forces in the Alpine region with the most famous name of bassist Andy Thommen. The highest point of the prog heaven they might not reach, but with 'The Chandrasekhar Limit' is chosen for an original approach to the genre.
Take PiGreco which theatrical prog ingeniously merges with jazz and funk. Or Matrimandir with his conjuring, oriental melody formation (and snippets sung in Sanskrit), samba rhythms, seventies jazz rock and medieval folk rock Gryphon. It is a big step forward compared to the previous album 'Surrender' (2006) where the influences of Marillion and Supertramp still finger-runs.
In the sweet ballad Lady Cub and playful rocker Pulsar the quintet as credible miniaturists. sounds In contrast, the twenty-minute opus The Daydream Suite, which is the circle. Brought opener Awaken already a salute to the great Floyd with their own take of the instrumental section of Echoes , then sound 'Dark Side Of The Moon', 'The Wall' and 'The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway' throughout this lengthy daydream. Although subtle, this is not working epigones. The vocals still does most reminiscent of Bernardo Lanzetti (PFM).
'The Chandrasekhar Limit' is made of very diverse influences, but has a remarkable homogeneous sound.However, the band had no preconceived purpose in writing this record. The only intention was to reconcile various moods and translate the game. Enjoyment to the listener There is one succeeded with brio.
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 Review: ZENIT REVIEW


http://www.dangerdog.com/2013-music-reviews/zenit-the-chandrasekhar-limit.php#.UYwnv7XEopc

ZENIT: THE CHANDRASEKHAR LIMIT
Zenit - The Chandrasekhar Limit Review

Zenit: The Chandrasekhar Limit

Melodic/Progressive Rock
4.0/5.0
Website Facebook 
Galileo Records
by Craig Hartranft,  05.04.2013
Zenit hails from Switzerland but their hearts and music are rooted in classic English prog. They bring their third album The Chandrasekhar Limit, which refers to the mathematical threshold that defines if a white dwarf star remains a star or becomes a black hole. But the album is not a conceptual piece built around this.
Zenit Band Photo
Zenit:: some happy fellows.
But it is a delightful collection melodic progressive rock marked by intriguing arrangements and skillful playing. You'll hear echoes of their influences and peers from The Flower Kings to Spock's Beard, Genesis to Pink Floyd, and Marillion to Saga. The atmosphere, or feeling, of The Chandrasekhar Limitis light and wistful, almost playful.
Yet, while not overly complex, you get copious amounts twists and turns to make this truly a prog album. What's interesting, and this may go back to the music sounding playful, is that Zenit seems to do all this with effortless ease. The music flows from these fellows like a stream unencumbered by obstacles or obstructions. You hear this in longer pieces like Awaken, Matrimandi, or the jazz-blues feel of Pigreco which move with clarity of purpose, yet retain a feeling of expectation that keeps you listening. And that's what good prog should do. Conversely, when it doesn't happen it can feel tiring, and the better than 24 minute The Daydream Suite comes dangerously close to wearing the listener out in the first ten minutes. Then there's the rather strange Cub Lady which, at the first spin, I had an instant dislike for. Nevertheless, for revisiting and re-envisioning classic melodic prog rock Zenit's The Chandrasekhar Limit is interesting and entertaining. Recommended.

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 Review: ZENIT REVIEWED AT 'ALL ABOUT JAZZ'


Switzerland - One of the most respected progressive rock bands ever to emerge from Switzerland, Zenit, have released their third album 'The Chandrasekhar Limit' on Galileo Records on January 28, 2013. Possibly the most ambitious release of 2013, right from the beginning of Zenit's new 69-minute masterpiece, Andy  (formerly Clepsydra), affixes a seal with his distinctive bass playing on the first song (“Awaken”). Later, with the start of the guitar, you will somewhat be reminded of the Clepsydra sound: awesome guitar-bass team play! Here is the beginning of what to expect from this brilliant album – quality!

Says Andy Thommen, “We've chosen 'The Chandrasekhar Limit' as the title because this mathematical threshold defines if a white dwarf star remains a star or becomes a black hole... So, as a band we feel that we are passing a crossroads without knowing where this track leads to. We do not know if we are above or below the Chandrasekhar limit.”

Read on...

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 Review: ZENIT REVIEW



Artist: Zenit
Album: The Chandrasekhar Limit
Year: 2013
Label: Galileo Records

Review:
 Diego Camargo

Rate: 

Thoughts: Zenit is a band from Switzerland that has been playing since 1998. The band was founded by Andy Thommen (formerly Clepsydra), Ivo Bernasconi and Gigio Pedruzzi. They’ve got 3 albums so far and The Chandrasekhar Limit (2013) is the newest one.

The Chandrasekhar Limit (2013) was released by Galileo Records in January and it’s being distributed by Gonzo Multimidia that in the last few years has become a specialist in Prog Rock.

Before anything else, it’s good to understand why such a weird name for their album. The Chandrasekhar Limit  is a mathematical term. It was named after the Indian-American Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar and defines if a white dwarf star remains a star or becomes a black hole.
According to the band they felt the same way, not knowing if they were above or below The Chandrasekhar Limit (as a metaphor for their music).

The Chandrasekhar Limit (2013) is bold and try to emulate the old glory days of Prog without fall in the usual clichés that some bands use. We have six tracks, almost 70 minutes of good music.
The album is based on long songs (12, 17 and 24 minutes long, for example), but there’s no sign of getting bored with it. Sometimes long running time CDs tend to be boring at the end, not here.

‘Awaken’ starts the album and it’s good to see some acoustic guitars. Actually, Lorenzo Sonognini is the vocalist and plays only the acoustic guitar, not on all the tracks, but it’s nice to see acoustic guitars as a base instrument. Lorenzo voice is hard to get used to in the beginning, but as soon as the first verses go along, his voice suits the music well.
‘Cub Lady’ is more a snippet of an idea than a proper track and ‘PiGreco’ is an instant classic.


‘Matrimandir’ has Sanskrit lyrics and the sound follows the lyrics with a hypnotic riff. A curiosity is the Bossa Nova part in the middle, and then a ‘progger’ part follows, three musical fields that, supposedly, have nothing to do with each other.

Read on...

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 Review: ZENIT BELGIAN REVIEW


 

ZENIT - The Chandrasekhar LIMIT
A seventy-minute plate with barely six numbers on it, which is something I do not often get presented for your review to Roots Time. Yet that is what happened to me today with the progressive rock album "The Chandrasekhar Limit" of the formation 'Zenit' established in 1998 in the Italian-speaking part of the country of Switzerland.
In 2001, this symphonic rock group playing first came on the music market, with their debut album "Pravritti" for which they had met a real singer with Lorenzo Sonognini Sonognini writes the lyrics he sings the ethereal music that is produced by his bandmates, being guitarist Luigi Biamino, keyboard player Ivo Bernasconi, bassist Andy Thommen and drummer Gabriele Schira.
'Zenit' plays on just about all the progressive rock festivals in Switzerland and Italy and found five years after the release of their debut came in 2006 when a second plate towards music world with the album "Surrender" to launch Now it took seven years before this third album "The Chandrasekhar Limit" was allowed to appear on the record market.
The first song "Awaken" is all right for a 12-minute symphonic rock, followed by lasting a scant 3 minutes Cub Lady ", the shortest track on this CD. "Pi Greco" is good for 7 and a half minutes and also for the video that you can watch and listen to.
According to our best track on the album is "Matrimandir", a 17 minute cinematic epic ethereal sounds and especially ripping guitar playing Luigi Biamino, but also very clever vocals Lorenzo Sonognini. Middle of the song there is also switched from rock to jazz to a few minutes later, back on the scene ending in the much louder rock sound
"Pulsar" is the most commercial sounding song and also in terms of time we stay under 6 minutes for airplay on the radio stations seem to be an absolute limit. For the last track, however, you pull a half hours during the 24 and a half minute "The Daydream Suite" as a whole wishes to listen.
If you want to compare the sound of 'Zenit' then you must think of a complex mix of the sound of 'Pink Floyd', 'Yes', 'Led Zeppelin' and 'Genesis'. That this Italian-speaking Swiss up there managed to enthrall despite this rather special way of making music from beginning to end is a merit that this quintet belongs only. Good work!
(Valsam)
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 Review: POLISH REVIEW OF ZENIT


ImageTeam Zenit was founded in 1995 by Andy Thommen (ex-bassist Clepsydre group) and keyboardist Ivo   For these two musicians playing the drums joined Pedruzzi Luigi, Frank Di Sessa guitarist and vocalist Lorenzo Sonognini. His debut album, "Pravritti" recorded in 2001, and five years later they released their second album Fri "Surrender". On the second disc featuring starring Stefano Zaccagni (saxophone), Mattia Santoro (cello), Ursula Maggini (flute), Marco Fontana and Calicantus Children's Choir.

As many as seven years we had to wait for their latest album "The Chandrasekhar Limit," which had its premiere on Jan. 28, 2013, and was released by Galileo Records. Even the album cover arouses interest and raises the question of whether the contents of music presented by the Swiss group will also sonically intriguing and space?

Looking at the list of tracks at once pay attention to three long compositions. All in all, this record is six songs that make up almost 70 minutes of music, so why listen. The first composition, "Awaken", begins with an acoustic guitar and vocals, this beautiful ring out the keys. Opens before us a classic neoprog climate, enriched sharper guitar solos and a pulsating bass sound that carry us in the 70s Beautifully inspire us to explore the next tracks contained on this album. A short, three-minute "Lady Cub" is something of genesisowych achievements, such at least my impression. The third track "Pigreco" group Zenit introduces elements of psychedelic, not fleeing from jazzujących sounds too. The whole is based on the solid foundation of a progressive sound. Boys can their music, its appropriately selected and mixed species content, customer interest and positively surprise him. In his works draw ideas from alternative and progressive achievements of a number of groups to form varied, but very varied, and most importantly, a very interesting music. On this album, singing not only in English, as we can see listening to more than 17-minute composition "Matrimandir", where oriental music takaż text and start the recording. In this work, we hear a chorus and a lot of various, wonderful style of instrumental sounds and acoustic jazzrockowych climates. In his final resounds again sung " ... Sarveā 'Svastir Bhavatu, Sarve'ā' SANTIR Bhavatu, Sarve'ā 'Pūr'a' Bhavatu, Sarve'ā 'Mangala' Bhavatu Om ". wonderful sounds from the vocal, it is hard to away from this piece and wants to sing it along with Lorenzo.

By the end of the disc there are still two compositions. Instrumental, vigorously executed, "Pulsar" every second is gaining momentum, and shows how much potential lies dormant in the creative team. In front of us the last music scene, but it is as done!"The Daydream Suite" from the very first minute delivers amazing experiences that grow as listening to this more than twenty-minute musical feast. Processed voice takes us into the air and allows the music to take a break from reality. Excited such a beautiful musical journey, the force with which the moves and stirs emotions in us, we want to remain with us for a long time, not wanting to go back to everyday life that surrounds us. The various eye-catching sounds that we hear in this track will not be able to separate us from the speakers, to discourage the music so well growing beautiful backing vocals, guitar solo and nastrojowymi keys. The last few minutes of the composition remains in the memory for a very long time. At the end of the song, after a short silence, we hear these words: "... In The End, It's Only Music". For some, it can and sound, but for those who are able to listen to the instrumental parts played beautifully, skillfully enhanced vocals, the music will leave an indelible mark in the sensitive soul.

Recommend to read this latest proposal team Zenit, which, as you can hear on the album, is constantly developing and seeking to enrich their sound. This album is impressive from start to finish. Can enchant melodic lines, grab his attention in batches bass guitar solos and beautiful, classic and modern sound keys, and complex and harmonious vocals. Active grabs the listener into another musical world. That's the album "The Chandrasekhar Limit".

At the end of the group Zenit remind Lorenzo Sonognini (vocals, acoustic guitar), Luigi Biamino (guitar, backing vocals), Ivo Bernasconi (keyboards), Andy Thommen (bass, backing vocals), Gabriele Schira (drums and percussion) and guest Stefano Zaccagni (saxophone), Asia Thommen, Diana Bernasconi, Maria Scandella, Ilaria Widmer (additional backing vocals of "The Daydream Suite"). The final word on the end of the album says Matt Goodluck. Cover is designed by Sander Kwiatkowski, who is also known album covers of bands such as Jungle, Clepsydre, Shakary and Amplify.

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 Review: ZENIT REVIEW


 

I must admit of being rather unaware of the Swiss band Zenit and their take on progressive rock. When I heard them described as neo prog, alarm bells were starting to go off in my head. In my experience, a lot of music labelled as neo prog turns out to be not very good. Still, I decided to give their latest album from 2013, The Chandrasekhar Limit, a go.

I’ve never been so happy to be mistaken. While this album may have a lot of the elements that most neo albums have, it is all done so well, with the emphasis on wonderful song-writing, joined by a very analytical arranging approach. With neo bands mostly favouring tributes to the 70s symphonic progressive scene, it’s would be easy to neglect other musical genres. Still, Zenit add some very daring touches to this picture. We have some jazzy segments to keep it interesting, but what really caught my attention was the Eastern influenced Matrimandir. The rest of the album features some epic progressive goodness and some catchier moments as well. It would have been a blinding album even without the untraditional neo elements, but with them it has risen to the status of “very special”.

With a Fish-y voice and Gilmour-like guitar, this album could have been headed for a typical neo showcase. The band managed to avoid these traps by adding some of their own ideas and musical fancies into the mix. It all works well and is especially fresh.

The album is warm and touches the soul, yet it is also highly serious and complex. A great combination of the heart and the brain working in unison.

8.5 out of 10.

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 Review: ZENIT REVIEW


 

The Chandrasekhar Limit is the third album from Swiss progressive act Zenit, with the album title referring to the mathematical threshold which defines if a white dwarf remains a star, or becomes a black-hole... and here was me thinking that it meant that things should sound like a mixture of Gabriel era Genesis, Fish era Marillion and countless Neo-Prog acts. Now perhaps that's a little unfair, with Zenit not being as blatant about their influences as many bands operating in this arena, with the six tracks on this album being mostly dreamy affairs more interested in setting scenes and telling stories than providing catchy choruses.
As expected the five musicians who make up the band are supremely talented, with the focused, yet meandering style taken on by Zenit allowing them all the space to really stretch out and work their instruments hard. To their credit, they do so, but without the need to be uber-technical, or sacrifice the song for the solo. That said, the over use of "play-time" bass noodling as a platform for more intricate guitar, keyboard, percussion sections to flourish, often removes the atmosphere built up and while prog is known as a facet of music where more time is given to songs to mature and grow, there's no doubt that some of this album is lengthier than the ideas truly merit. However with the niggles out of the way, what tracks like "Pulsar" and "PiGreco" do extremely well, is to layer sound that envelopes the listener and take them on the travels the songs so ably describe.
Much of the album is instrumental, although the lyrics are plentiful too, with the vocal interludes from Lorenzo Sonognini adding colour and imagery to the music in fine style. Closing piece "The Daydream Suite", which runs to nearly twenty five minutes, sums up both Zenit and their third album very well indeed, illustrating both the frustrations and rewards served up here in abundance. Long instrumental sections veer between pointed and pointless, while the vocals appear to bring all the disparate strands back together. It makes for an unusual journey where within one song your attention can slide between unbreakable and shattered.
Possibly one of the most accomplished 70s inspired prog albums I've heard so far this year, that doesn't stop The Chandrasekhar Limit from being almost as frustrating to listen to, as is it to type. If you are one of those lucky enough to still have completely free afternoons to sit with nothing else in the world to interrupt your music, you could do much worse than spend it with Zenit. Others may find that time to feel lost and underused.

Track Listing
1. Awaken
2. Cub Lady
3. PiGreco
4. Matrimandir
5. Pulsar
6. The Daydream Suite

Added: April 5th 2013
Reviewer: Steven Reid
Score: 
Related Link: Zenit Online
Hits: 5
Language: english

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 Review: ZENIT REVIEW


 


Spot Light: Zenit – The Chandrasekhar Limit 
(2013 Galileo Records)


From Switzerland hails a Prog band that I’m just becoming aware of. They are going by the name Zenit, and they just came out with a new CD entitled The Chandrasekhar Limit. Their third release according to their official website. 

So, a friend who knows I like Prog Rock (an understatement), snail-mailed Zenit’s,The Chandrasekhar Limit, to me. Worse thing that can happen is that I use it for a drink coaster, right? After spending more then a week listening to the almost 70 minute disc, giving the CD numerous repeated spins, I conclude it’s a solid Prog rock CD inside (the music) and out (artwork). 


The first track on a CD can sometimes be a make-it or break-it thing. Start off with a luke-warm song and expectations from the listener, also called consumer, in some instances, can immediately start declining. Flip side, come out of the gate with a kick-ass number, and that same listener now expects the consistency to last throughout the playing of the disc. Now we're talking, a perfect album. How hard is that to make? I imagine that’s the intention of every musician who reserves time in a recording studio. The Chandrasekhar Limit starts off with voice and acoustic guitar. The simple beginnings of a masterpiece.

Being old school, every time I played this Zenit recording I could not help but hear old school Prog influences such as early Genesis, Jon Anderson-era Yes, Spock’s Beard (especially on the first composition Awaken), and early Pink Floyd. You get the picture. And as much as I like rocking out I was pleased when I heard a Ted Nugent, Stranglehold era vibe. Made me want to turn up the volume to eleven. More bands and musicians from Prog's past come to mind actually. The idea here in regards to writing this review, is in part pass on through the written word what something sounds like. Zenit is guilty of hovering over the old school Prog Hall of Fame, but at the same time the group maintains via solid musicianship abilities for creating tight and memorable musical compositions, that are clearly all their own. Experience shows, by knowing and understanding song structure and as a solid unit knowing how to get the job done, gets the end results one is looking for. Here it is maintaining the ability to write a memorable composition. This is a huge step up from the formulated rock/prog bands I see dominating the current playing field. For I see 21st century rock prog bands as being even better than their predecessors. To sound like them is one thing, but to create uniqueness that far exceed expectations and live in people’s mind their entire life, is soon to happen when fresh blood is introduced. Zenit represents to me in the year 2013, what a current Prog rock band should sound like. No shit !! Like when I first heard Spock’s Beard, back in the mid to late 90’s. There was an excitement in the air coming out of my home speakers as I played their magnificent debut album, The Light. I’m receiving the same vibe with Zenit’s, The Chandrasekhar Limit. It’s a good feeling. 


http://classicrockradioeu.blogspot.co.uk/2013/04/zenit-chandrasekhar-limit-review.html

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 Review: FRENCH ZENIT REVIEW


http://musicwaves.fr/frmChronique.aspx?pro_id=9746&url_ref=Zenit_The_Chandrasekhar_Limit

Group formed at the beginning of this millennium by Andy Thommen (former bassist Clepsydra ) and Ivo Bernasconi keyboards assured that the same group during the mini-tour "More Grains of Sand", Zenit publishes the year 2013 his third album, The Chandrasekhar Limit . Given the origins of the founders of the group, it would be easy to categorize as a Zenit nth group is sticking to neo-prog, and more like a clone Clepsydra. The latter goes, turn the page right away to say that the music offered by Swiss quintet does little closer to the neo-progressive upscale its congeners. The major similarity with respect to this style is to be sought in IQ, with a few passages that would not deny the British group, the intonation of the singer recalling be mistaken Peter Nicholls (with the same lack of accuracy in treble way!) ( Pigreco , Matrimandir ).

The instrumental Pulsar is a pure delight in style, with a different melody twists, all on a syncopated rhythmic shaking deliciously neurons. Zenit But where apart from his classmates, it is well with a variety most important musical worlds. References to progressive are obviously present, with a few nods to Andy Tillison and The Tangent ( Pigreco ), prog jazz party returning regularly in long compositions, but also large sequences strongly inspired by Pink Floyd , including a great instrumental break streaking the superb Awaken that recall the hypnotic atmospheres live in Pompeii, but also the chorus reinforced by female choirs at the end of the last track, strongly evocative of the last live performances of the group. Zenit does not, however, simply only these prestigious references to compose music, and ride the listener in a wide musical spectrum, the most obvious example being Matrimandir containing a blend of Indian-inspired music (within the meaning of the term Asian) including words in the local language, passages ambience worthy of the music played during one day strike at Radio France, chorus and symphony light.On this reading, the whole might seem very heterogeneous and unprepossessing, but it is nothing; 17 minutes of listening to the composition in one go, taking more and more important over the repetitions , validating the same time the project group not just narrow musical codes.

Paradoxically, outside of Lady Cub , acoustic song rather off-topic, and after the last 24 minutes of music is revealed as the least successful of all and drags somewhat in length, provided that the structure of this sequence and the porcupine its parts does not necessarily jump to the ears. Despite these reminiscences, The Chandrasekhar Limit one brand leap forward from earlier productions of the group, and deliver many moments of happiness to listeners who take the time to immerse themselves in the music far richer than it seems at first. Chronicle written byTonyB 27.03.2013

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 Review: PORTUGUESE REVIEW OF ZENIT


http://vianocturna2000.blogspot.pt/2013/04/review-chandrasekhar-limit-zenit.html


Review: The Chandrasekhar Limit (Zenit)

The Chandrasekhar Limit (Zenit)
(2013, Galileo Records / Gonzo Multimedia)
(5/5)
Everyone knows the British and Swedish schools (especially those) of rockprogressive. But ... and Switzerland?Probably not if you talk in school but that's where it comes one of the most impressive names in the old continent within this genre. It's called Zenit and despite a long career (formed in 1998), your nest egg is not very intense, and The Chandrasekar Limit only his third album, being distanced seven years of his predecessor. Plenty of time to prepare a set of great songs, let them grow and mature, probably prepared without any pressure. The result in the form of six subjects spread over about 70 minutes, is simply superb! Think of all the big names in progressive history: Pink Floyd , Yes , Genesis , Neal Morse , The Flower Kings ... Now think of all its major features and more grandiose ... The Zenit can join them all! Matrimandir , a theme of 17 minutes is one of the most sublime moments on this disc by its Indian flavor where even missing passages in Sanskrit. But already before, Awaken and PiGregohad proved crucial parts in any discography of prog rock and Cub Lady , the shortest way to the theme almost interlude, a sensual ballad. By the end there is still time for plenty instrumental rock oriented Pulsar and sensational The Daydream Suite , an epic 25 minutes that summarizes the entire disk with their keyboards solos, melodic guitars, choirs and superb complex bass lines. Chandrasekhar Limit The a disc is a must for any fan of rock progressive!
Tracklist:
One.      Awaken
2nd.      Cub Lady
3.      PIGRECO
4th.      Matrimandir
5th.      Pulsar
6th.      Daydream The Suite
Line-up:
Lorenzo Sonognini - vocals and acoustic guitars
Luigi Biamino - guitars
Ivo Bernasconi - keyboards
Andy Thommen - bass and guitars
Gabriele Schira - drums
Guests: 
Stefano Zaccagni - saxophone
Asia Thommen - backing vocals
Diana Bernasconi - backing vocals
Maria Scandella - backing vocals
Ilaria Widmer - backing vocals
 


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The Chandrasekhar Limit
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 Review: ZENIT REVIEW


http://www.muzikreviews.com/reviews.php?ID=2506




Genre: Progressive Rock
Label: Gonzo Import
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Tracks

1. Awaken
2. Cub Lady
3. Pigreco
4. Matrimander
5. Pulsar
6. The Daydream Suite
Zenit
The Chandrasekhar Limit


This review is on a release that I probably would not have unearthed on my own, so yet again I have to be thankful that I do a review slot. The album is The Chandrasekhar Limit and is release number three from the Italian speaking Swiss band, Zenit. Originally founded back in 1998, they released their debut album,Pavritti, in 2001 and their follow-up, Surrender, in 2006. Currently a 5 piece band, Zenit still have two of the original members from 1998, the keyboard player and the bass player. The full breakdown of the band is - Lorenzo Sonognini (acoustic guitar and vocals), Luigi Biamino (guitar and backing vocals), Ivo Bernasconi (keyboards), Andy Thommen (bass and backing vocals) and Gabrielle Schira (drums and percussion).
Founder and bass player Andy Thommen says, “We've chosen The Chandrasekhar Limit as the title because this mathematical threshold defines if a white dwarf star remains a star or becomes a black hole... So, as a band we feel that we are passing a crossroads without knowing where this track leads to. We do not know if we are above or below the Chandrasekhar limit.”
Unusually for me, I will state at the outset that this is one of those releases that hit the “sweet spot.” There have been some amazing albums released recently, but this is one of the “head and shoulders” above the majority, and that was a decision made after only one hearing.
The Chandrasekhar Limit is a 6 track album with a total running time just under 70 minutes, with track 2, “Cub Lady”, the shortest at 2:42 minutes and the final track, “The Daydream Suite”, the longest at 24:35 minutes.
Now we can get down to business explaining why this is such an awesome album to have reviewed. I will admit that I enjoy all the tracks on the album and in the 10 days I have had the album to review, two tracks have already been featured on my radio program.
The opening track on The Chandrasekhar Limit is all that the first track on any release should be, and that is, instantly accessible and with killer riffs, passages and vocals. “Awaken,” (12:05) certainly ticks all of these boxes when after around 15 seconds of acoustic guitar with vocals, the track launches into a superbly memorable soaring guitar and keyboard riff which continues to weave in and out over the length of the track. There is an amazing passage from around 4 minutes (until just short of the 8 minute mark) where, over the terrific drumming by Gabrielle and bass work by Andy, the soaring guitar of Luigi lays a tremendous passage over the top, with the keyboards of Ivo weaving here and there in the background. This passage is very reminiscent of early Pink Floyd material. The track then breaks into a plaintive piano passage which fits so well and this is then joined by the superb acoustic guitar work of Lorenzo. Around the 9 minute point, we have rejoined the recurrent theme from earlier and the track builds and drives along to 12 minutes with stunning guitar and keyboard effects during the last minute.
“Matrimandir” (17:08), is the other track I have featured and has a very Indian orientated sound to it with some of the ensuing vocals in Sanskrit and English. A sitar and a very ethnic sounding background show the versatility of the band prior to the electric guitar picking up and carrying the sitar riff onwards. Slight changes in tempo are used to accentuate sections and Luigi (on guitar) certainly shows he can play the instrument. Lorenzo’s vocals are extremely clear, even when they might not be understandable as they are in Sanskrit. At around the 4:40 minute point, there is a very distinct shift to a more jazz fusion passage with electric piano, guitar and simple crisp drumming before the keyboards briefly enter and leave again. Andy, on bass, also gets the opportunity to push the bass guitar to the fore in this passage. About halfway through the track, it morphs into a simple acoustic guitar passage with an almost choral vocal over it before the bass again adds more depth to the proceedings. There is more of the magnificent piano around 11:30 minutes which takes the track into another beautiful acoustic area which builds to the whole band in full flow again. The track then moves into its final phases where the initial theme reappears and the track plays out as it started over 17 minutes before.
The other four tracks on The Chandrasekhar Limit are no less interesting, leading to another 5 star award earner. “Cub Lady” is a short acoustic based track and “PiGreco” is a keyboard driven up-tempo track with powerful vocals and superb drum/bass playing and ”Pulsar” is an instrumental and probably nearer a jazz fusion track than the others. The long last track, “The Daydream Suite,” certainly has its dreamy passages interspersed with more magnificent individual performances to end the album on a “huge high.”
At the outset, I indicated that this was to be an extremely positive review and I repeat, that even with all the tremendous recent releases, this is certainly close to being the best CD I have had to review (Well, at least in the Top 3).
Another of my special double-sized, full color “One To Buy” stickers on the front, and I might have to get more printed if releases continue to be superb, and a plea to every prog follower to beg or borrow (we don’t advocate the stealing) this CD and then do the “right thing” and buy it. I do not think that anyone would find The Chandrasekhar Limit anything but stunning.
Key Tracks: Awaken, Matrimander.
Jim “The Ancient One” Lawson-MuzikReviews.com Staff
March 22, 2013
For Questions Or Comments About This Review Send An Email Toinfo@muzikreviews.com

CURRRENTLY AVAILABLE FROM GONZO

The Chandrasekhar Limit
CD - £9.99

 Review: ZENIT REVIEW


Zenit US/UK review:


Classic Rock Radio Dot EU
22 March 2013
Classic Rock Radio Dot EU – New Music Review
Spot Light: Zenit – The Chandrasekhar Limit (2013 Galileo Records)
From Switzerland hails a Prog band that I’m just becoming aware of. They are going by the name Zenit, and they just came out with a new CD entitled The Chandrasekhar Limit. Their third release according to their official website.
So, a friend who knows I like Prog Rock (an understatement), snail-mailed Zenit’s,The Chandrasekhar Limit, to me. Worse thing that can happen is that I use it for a drink coaster, right? After spending more then a week listening to the almost 70 minute disc, giving the CD numerous repeated spins, I conclude it’s a solid Prog rock CD inside (the music) and out (artwork).
The first track on a CD can sometimes be a make-it or break-it thing. Start off with a luke-warm song and expectations from the listener, also called consumer, in some instances, can immediately start declining. Flip side, come out of the gate with a kick-ass number, and that same listener now expects the consistency to last throughout the playing of the disc. Now we're talking, a perfect album. How hard is that to make? I imagine that’s the intention of every musician who reserves time in a recording studio. The Chandrasekhar Limit starts off with voice and acoustic guitar. The simple beginnings of a masterpiece.

Being old school, every time I played this Zenit recording I could not help but hear old school Prog influences such as early Genesis, Jon Anderson-era Yes, Spock’s Beard (especially on the first composition Awaken), and early Pink Floyd. You get the picture. And as much as I like rocking out I was pleased when I heard a Ted Nugent, Stranglehold era vibe. Made me want to turn up the volume to eleven. More bands and musicians from Prog's past come to mind actually. The idea here in regards to writing this review, is in part pass on through the written word what something sounds like. Zenit is guilty of hovering over the old school Prog Hall of Fame, but at the same time the group maintains via solid musicianship abilities for creating tight and memorable musical compositions, that are clearly all their own. Experience shows, by knowing and understanding song structure and as a solid unit (he said unit) knowing how to get the job done, gets the end results one is looking for. Here it is maintaining the ability to write a memorable composition. This is a huge step up from the formulated rock/prog bands I see dominating the current playing field. For I see 21st century rock prog bands as being even better than their predecessors. To sound like them is one thing, but to create uniqueness that far exceed expectations and live in people’s mind their entire life, is soon to happen when fresh blood is introduced. Zenit represents to me in the year 2013, what a current Prog rock band should sound like. No shit !! Like when I first heard Spock’s Beard, back in the mid to late 90’s. There was an excitement in the air coming out of my home speakers as I played their magnificent debut album, The Light. I’m receiving the same vibe with Zenit’s, The Chandrasekhar Limit. It’s a good feeling.
 
So what are Uncle G’s absolute favorite tracks on this stellar release? On first listen, what caught my attention most was the instrumental song "Pulsar". Then the Jethro Tull sounding harmonies got me into the song "Cub Lady". A few more listens of "Matrimandir" and I caught a Jon Anderson aura filling my home office. And then the most obvious, the first track they call "Awaken". I really dig the various grooves coming from the bass of Andy Thommen. His work sounds awesome on Sennheiser headphones (those preferred by Uncle G but not necessarily his associates). I imagine via any speaker, he comes in loud and clear. Within the twelve minute first track, all members demonstrate what they bring to the table. 
Vocals come to mind with the song "PiGreco". The bands lead vocalist; Lorenzo Sonognini. It’s here where I really dug how voice and musical presentation come together. In Prog tradition, this piece of music changes streams a few times and comes in at right under eight minutes. Presented as well as the ones I just previously mentioned.
Following other Prog rock traditions, the CD closes with an almost twenty-five minute grand opus called "The Daydream Suite". It has a mellow vibe in the beginning then kicks in after the two minute mark with some awesome synths and harmonies. Then this classic Genesis vibe fills the room. Seriously infectious drum and bass work with a standout Tony Banks feel coming from the magic keys of Ivo Bernasconi. Why am I reminded for a moment of the keyboard work found on ELO’s Discovery? Or that funky groove sometimes found on Flower King recordings? It’s all good !!! These are group compositions, with lyrics mostly by Sonognini. In the credits all band members receive full acknowledgements (song writing). Smart move when considering their are business aspects to this.
Zenit’s 2013 release of The Chandrasekhar Limit is a simple breath of fresh air for me, the decades old progressive rock music connoisseur that I am. Zenit is a fine example of what I would define as a 21st century Prog band. I'm comfortable enough to say that The Chandrasekhar Limit is so far the BEST new studio CD or original Prog rock music that I heard come out this year.
Uncle G’s Rating: Odds are I gave myself away by the first paragraph of this review. Out of five stars; FIVE SOLID STARS !!! Now I want to know EVERYTHING about this band. Way cool !! Zenit rules !! Nice job to all involved. Thanks for keeping things on the prog side. From Space City, a mere five thousand miles away, I'm finally hearing you loud and clear.
Gary Brown
American Correspondent for Classic Rock Radio Dot EU
PS: "In the end, it’s only music" – Zenit 2013

 Review: ZENIT REVIEW


http://www.muzikreviews.com/reviews.php?ID=2506




Genre: Progressive Rock
Label: Gonzo Import
Visit Web Site

Tracks

1. Awaken
2. Cub Lady
3. Pigreco
4. Matrimander
5. Pulsar
6. The Daydream Suite
Zenit
The Chandrasekhar Limit


This review is on a release that I probably would not have unearthed on my own, so yet again I have to be thankful that I do a review slot. The album is The Chandrasekhar Limit and is release number three from the Italian speaking Swiss band, Zenit. Originally founded back in 1998, they released their debut album,Pavritti, in 2001 and their follow-up, Surrender, in 2006. Currently a 5 piece band, Zenit still have two of the original members from 1998, the keyboard player and the bass player. The full breakdown of the band is - Lorenzo Sonognini (acoustic guitar and vocals), Luigi Biamino (guitar and backing vocals), Ivo Bernasconi (keyboards), Andy Thommen (bass and backing vocals) and Gabrielle Schira (drums and percussion).
Founder and bass player Andy Thommen says, “We've chosen The Chandrasekhar Limit as the title because this mathematical threshold defines if a white dwarf star remains a star or becomes a black hole... So, as a band we feel that we are passing a crossroads without knowing where this track leads to. We do not know if we are above or below the Chandrasekhar limit.”
Unusually for me, I will state at the outset that this is one of those releases that hit the “sweet spot.” There have been some amazing albums released recently, but this is one of the “head and shoulders” above the majority, and that was a decision made after only one hearing.
The Chandrasekhar Limit is a 6 track album with a total running time just under 70 minutes, with track 2, “Cub Lady”, the shortest at 2:42 minutes and the final track, “The Daydream Suite”, the longest at 24:35 minutes.
Now we can get down to business explaining why this is such an awesome album to have reviewed. I will admit that I enjoy all the tracks on the album and in the 10 days I have had the album to review, two tracks have already been featured on my radio program.
The opening track on The Chandrasekhar Limit is all that the first track on any release should be, and that is, instantly accessible and with killer riffs, passages and vocals. “Awaken,” (12:05) certainly ticks all of these boxes when after around 15 seconds of acoustic guitar with vocals, the track launches into a superbly memorable soaring guitar and keyboard riff which continues to weave in and out over the length of the track. There is an amazing passage from around 4 minutes (until just short of the 8 minute mark) where, over the terrific drumming by Gabrielle and bass work by Andy, the soaring guitar of Luigi lays a tremendous passage over the top, with the keyboards of Ivo weaving here and there in the background. This passage is very reminiscent of early Pink Floyd material. The track then breaks into a plaintive piano passage which fits so well and this is then joined by the superb acoustic guitar work of Lorenzo. Around the 9 minute point, we have rejoined the recurrent theme from earlier and the track builds and drives along to 12 minutes with stunning guitar and keyboard effects during the last minute.
“Matrimandir” (17:08), is the other track I have featured and has a very Indian orientated sound to it with some of the ensuing vocals in Sanskrit and English. A sitar and a very ethnic sounding background show the versatility of the band prior to the electric guitar picking up and carrying the sitar riff onwards. Slight changes in tempo are used to accentuate sections and Luigi (on guitar) certainly shows he can play the instrument. Lorenzo’s vocals are extremely clear, even when they might not be understandable as they are in Sanskrit. At around the 4:40 minute point, there is a very distinct shift to a more jazz fusion passage with electric piano, guitar and simple crisp drumming before the keyboards briefly enter and leave again. Andy, on bass, also gets the opportunity to push the bass guitar to the fore in this passage. About halfway through the track, it morphs into a simple acoustic guitar passage with an almost choral vocal over it before the bass again adds more depth to the proceedings. There is more of the magnificent piano around 11:30 minutes which takes the track into another beautiful acoustic area which builds to the whole band in full flow again. The track then moves into its final phases where the initial theme reappears and the track plays out as it started over 17 minutes before.
The other four tracks on The Chandrasekhar Limit are no less interesting, leading to another 5 star award earner. “Cub Lady” is a short acoustic based track and “PiGreco” is a keyboard driven up-tempo track with powerful vocals and superb drum/bass playing and ”Pulsar” is an instrumental and probably nearer a jazz fusion track than the others. The long last track, “The Daydream Suite,” certainly has its dreamy passages interspersed with more magnificent individual performances to end the album on a “huge high.”
At the outset, I indicated that this was to be an extremely positive review and I repeat, that even with all the tremendous recent releases, this is certainly close to being the best CD I have had to review (Well, at least in the Top 3).
Another of my special double-sized, full color “One To Buy” stickers on the front, and I might have to get more printed if releases continue to be superb, and a plea to every prog follower to beg or borrow (we don’t advocate the stealing) this CD and then do the “right thing” and buy it. I do not think that anyone would find The Chandrasekhar Limit anything but stunning.
Key Tracks: Awaken, Matrimander.
Jim “The Ancient One” Lawson-MuzikReviews.com Staff
March 22, 2013
For Questions Or Comments About This Review Send An Email Toinfo@muzikreviews.com

CURRRENTLY AVAILABLE FROM GONZO

The Chandrasekhar Limit
CD - £9.99

 Review: ZENIT REVIEW


Zenit US/UK review:


Classic Rock Radio Dot EU
22 March 2013
Classic Rock Radio Dot EU – New Music Review
Spot Light: Zenit – The Chandrasekhar Limit (2013 Galileo Records)
From Switzerland hails a Prog band that I’m just becoming aware of. They are going by the name Zenit, and they just came out with a new CD entitled The Chandrasekhar Limit. Their third release according to their official website.
So, a friend who knows I like Prog Rock (an understatement), snail-mailed Zenit’s,The Chandrasekhar Limit, to me. Worse thing that can happen is that I use it for a drink coaster, right? After spending more then a week listening to the almost 70 minute disc, giving the CD numerous repeated spins, I conclude it’s a solid Prog rock CD inside (the music) and out (artwork).
The first track on a CD can sometimes be a make-it or break-it thing. Start off with a luke-warm song and expectations from the listener, also called consumer, in some instances, can immediately start declining. Flip side, come out of the gate with a kick-ass number, and that same listener now expects the consistency to last throughout the playing of the disc. Now we're talking, a perfect album. How hard is that to make? I imagine that’s the intention of every musician who reserves time in a recording studio. The Chandrasekhar Limit starts off with voice and acoustic guitar. The simple beginnings of a masterpiece.

Being old school, every time I played this Zenit recording I could not help but hear old school Prog influences such as early Genesis, Jon Anderson-era Yes, Spock’s Beard (especially on the first composition Awaken), and early Pink Floyd. You get the picture. And as much as I like rocking out I was pleased when I heard a Ted Nugent, Stranglehold era vibe. Made me want to turn up the volume to eleven. More bands and musicians from Prog's past come to mind actually. The idea here in regards to writing this review, is in part pass on through the written word what something sounds like. Zenit is guilty of hovering over the old school Prog Hall of Fame, but at the same time the group maintains via solid musicianship abilities for creating tight and memorable musical compositions, that are clearly all their own. Experience shows, by knowing and understanding song structure and as a solid unit (he said unit) knowing how to get the job done, gets the end results one is looking for. Here it is maintaining the ability to write a memorable composition. This is a huge step up from the formulated rock/prog bands I see dominating the current playing field. For I see 21st century rock prog bands as being even better than their predecessors. To sound like them is one thing, but to create uniqueness that far exceed expectations and live in people’s mind their entire life, is soon to happen when fresh blood is introduced. Zenit represents to me in the year 2013, what a current Prog rock band should sound like. No shit !! Like when I first heard Spock’s Beard, back in the mid to late 90’s. There was an excitement in the air coming out of my home speakers as I played their magnificent debut album, The Light. I’m receiving the same vibe with Zenit’s, The Chandrasekhar Limit. It’s a good feeling.
 
So what are Uncle G’s absolute favorite tracks on this stellar release? On first listen, what caught my attention most was the instrumental song "Pulsar". Then the Jethro Tull sounding harmonies got me into the song "Cub Lady". A few more listens of "Matrimandir" and I caught a Jon Anderson aura filling my home office. And then the most obvious, the first track they call "Awaken". I really dig the various grooves coming from the bass of Andy Thommen. His work sounds awesome on Sennheiser headphones (those preferred by Uncle G but not necessarily his associates). I imagine via any speaker, he comes in loud and clear. Within the twelve minute first track, all members demonstrate what they bring to the table. 
Vocals come to mind with the song "PiGreco". The bands lead vocalist; Lorenzo Sonognini. It’s here where I really dug how voice and musical presentation come together. In Prog tradition, this piece of music changes streams a few times and comes in at right under eight minutes. Presented as well as the ones I just previously mentioned.
Following other Prog rock traditions, the CD closes with an almost twenty-five minute grand opus called "The Daydream Suite". It has a mellow vibe in the beginning then kicks in after the two minute mark with some awesome synths and harmonies. Then this classic Genesis vibe fills the room. Seriously infectious drum and bass work with a standout Tony Banks feel coming from the magic keys of Ivo Bernasconi. Why am I reminded for a moment of the keyboard work found on ELO’s Discovery? Or that funky groove sometimes found on Flower King recordings? It’s all good !!! These are group compositions, with lyrics mostly by Sonognini. In the credits all band members receive full acknowledgements (song writing). Smart move when considering their are business aspects to this.
Zenit’s 2013 release of The Chandrasekhar Limit is a simple breath of fresh air for me, the decades old progressive rock music connoisseur that I am. Zenit is a fine example of what I would define as a 21st century Prog band. I'm comfortable enough to say that The Chandrasekhar Limit is so far the BEST new studio CD or original Prog rock music that I heard come out this year.
Uncle G’s Rating: Odds are I gave myself away by the first paragraph of this review. Out of five stars; FIVE SOLID STARS !!! Now I want to know EVERYTHING about this band. Way cool !! Zenit rules !! Nice job to all involved. Thanks for keeping things on the prog side. From Space City, a mere five thousand miles away, I'm finally hearing you loud and clear.
Gary Brown
American Correspondent for Classic Rock Radio Dot EU
PS: "In the end, it’s only music" – Zenit 2013

 Review: ZENIT/CRIS ROVERSI REVIEWS


http://freq.org.uk/reviews/zenit-cristiano-roversi/

Zenit – The Chandrasekhar Limit/Cristiano Roversi – AntiQua
Zenit - The Chandrasekhar LimitIt seems that prog rock is alive and well in Europe again, which is a fantastic thing. And two of the countries that were most feverish about the original bands in the ’70s here prove their worth with these two releases from Galileo Records.
 
like a stripped back Topographic Oceans.
Zenit (from Switzerland) begin their album with with “Awaken” – not a cover of the Yes song, but an opus of their own. Acoustic guitars and gentle vocals open, before organ and drums hit in and the song take flight. Some wonderful Moog playing takes us through to a quiet piano section. The is very reminiscent of early Marillion at times; at other points, as in the lead guitar section, it feels sometimes we are knocking on the door of Rush. This hints more in the direction of the ’80s prog revival acts such as IQ. “Cub Lady” is a bittersweet acoustic interlude with a majestic bass line. Next up is “PiGreco,” a jaunty 9/8 style drum patterns scattered around underneath jazz piano chords. When the staccato chorus comes in I am reminded of early Magma. Some quite moving lead guitar feels out its more reflective middle section. The track ends with some epic Moog and guitar and an almost Steve Howe flourish.
“Matrimandir” has tribal drums and a sparkling Rick Wakeman-like lead keyboard line for its intro. From here on in we venture in to Yes eastern tonal territory, like a stripped back Topographic Oceans. Chanting vocals also help this analogy, and the vocals at time do sound like Mike Heron from the Incredible String Band. A lovely jazz workout middle section takes the track elsewhere with some guitar licks sounding like the late Peter Banks. When it moves into its acoustic section you can breathe in the influence of Trick of the Tail-era Genesis. Over its 17 minutes, the track takes you through various different landscapes but works best when it gets pastoral. “Pulsar” starts with a skiffle type shuffle that blends in with Howe-style atonlisms on guitar and some steady piano work. When the rhythm breaks through we are taken on a Asia style ride of how to play prog.
it’s great to hear some proper Vocoder vocals
The last track on the album is “The Daydream Suite,” the bands 24 minute magnum opus. It opens with some rather pretty Tony Banks-style piano playing before we move into the song proper. With some rather uplifting singing and chords we move back into Marillion territory by way of Pink Floyd. The sections build into an apotheosis of light with touches of shade and it’s great to hear some proper Vocoder vocals as well. The album as whole is wonderfully well played with a lot thought going in to the arrangements especially on ‘Daydream…’ This is proper Prog from its lilting quieter moments to the bombast of its louder sections.
Cristiano Roversi - AntiQuaItalian composer Cristiano Roversi’s album almost seems like a concept record. The opening track “Morning in AntiQua” is quite beautiful, all shimmering Anthony Phillips pastoral acoustic guitars and subtle piano. When the rhythm comes in the electric guitars take us skyward and its here that I hear the influence ofSteve Hackett. “Tales from Solitude Suite” plays out like a marvellous atmospheric score for a Lord of the Rings-style movie, as uplifting chords move into a shadow aspect of darkness while the vocals spin their tragic tale. Here we touch upon early Genesis, especially with the acoustic guitars and Mellotron mixture. “L’amore” is a more straightforward love song similar in feel to Rush’s “Closer to the Heart,” with its lovely acoustic guitar and organ combination. “Nessie Revealed” piles on the atmosphere with Oberheim-sounding synths that create lush landscapes of other worlds.
lush landscapes of other worlds
“Falling” has some female vocals singing over crystalline synths, and she sings of butterflies and spacecraft that gives the sound of LSD-induced dreams that meetFrank Frazetta-style fantasy. The acoustic and flute part conjures up images ofTrespass-era Genesis. “Dimlit Tavern” carries on the album’s fantasy theme as the music guides us into a Tolkien-style Middle Earth and the melody conjures up the images of dwarves and Hobbits drinking in a secluded ale house. A drum machine heralds in “Nirayed’s Secret Diary” and the track builds with its lush melancholic strings. Here again we are verging more into soundtrack territory as some of these pieces could fit exceedingly well within a fantasy film.
sings of butterflies and spacecraft that gives the sound of LSD-induced dreams
“AntiQua” is an elegant instrumental lead by strings and oboe and touched uponAnthony Phillips’ The Geese and the Ghost album at times. In fact I could almost imagine Phil Collins singing over this track, especially by the time theTony Banks-sounding lead keyboard comes in. “AntiQua Evening” is a beautiful piano coda to end the album and bring the entire record to a full circle, satisfying climax. Again the album is beautifully played and especially some of the more subtle numbers work very well. If you like Peter Gabriel-era Genesis this one is definitely for you.
These are two fine prog releases from Galileo, with fantastic artwork adorning both albums and a lot of care taken over both titles. If you are a prog fan check them out.
-Gary Parsons-

CRIS ROVERSI AT GONZO
AntiQua
CD - £9.99
ZENIT AT GONZO

 Review: ZENIT REVIEW


 

 


Zenit – The Chandrasekhar Limit
Galileo Records
http://www.fragile.net/
Rating: B
Zenit is a band from Switzerland that has been lurking around since 1998.  The band has not exactly set the world on fire with their output, as this is only their third release in all of that time.  What they lack in album releases, however, they make up for in creativity.  The Chandrasekhar Limit is one of the best Progressive rock albums released in recent memory.  The songs are well composed and elaborate and contain originality, while at the same time tipping the hat to their obvious influences, which include Genesis, Marillion, Supertramp, Kansas and Gentle Giant. 
Founder and bass player Andy Thommen says, “We've chosen The Chandrasekhar Limit as the title because this mathematical threshold defines if a white dwarf star remains a star or becomes a black hole... So, as a band we feel that we are passing a crossroads without knowing where this track leads to. We do not know if we are above or below the Chandrasekhar limit. 
“We started writing and demoing the new album with our previous drummer Luigi Pedruzzi. For most of the songs we started on a rough idea by our keyboardist Ivo Bernasconi, then the whole band worked on it, until it was ready for a demo recording. Working on it for us means play it over and over again with absolute freedom to improvise changes, and normally when we get a few 'wow' reactions in the band we know we are close. 
“The longest track 'The Daydream Suite' was different. Ivo had just a basic idea; we started playing on it, it just came one note after the the other, one chord after the other. This was a magic band experience. When we finished recording the demos our drummer left the band. We made one single call to a friend and drummer. As he was teaching drums in Lausanne, we asked him if by chance he knew someone... His answer was 'Me'! Within a bit more than a half a year he was ready to record the drum tracks for The Chandrasekhar Limit with a fresh breath of new energy! In sum, the essence of our way to work is: play it, play it and play it again until it sounds good, and only then you can start recording.”
“There was no structured plan for this album. No plan to make it symphonic, epic, neo or retro...it just came out as it is,” says Thommen. “Here are jazzy and samba rhythms, even Sanskrit lyrics bits and Indian sounds and ambiances. The only thing we wanted to create was an ensemble of very different ambiances and feelings, and transmits to the listener the fun we have playing these songs.”
The band effortlessly mixes surreal Pink Floyd moments with complex instrumental passages.  This is music made for musicians; just like all of the best Prog rock out there.  
While Prog rock is not a popular style of music in 2013, it is awesome that bands like Zenit our doing this, and doing it so well.  
By Jeb Wright
CURRENTLY AVAILABLE AT GONZO

 Review: FRENCH REVIEW OF ZENIT


 

Zenit is a Swiss Italian born in 1998 and his third album out here in Galileo. Dominated by guitar and bass, their music is inspired by Genesis but also jazz influences. Here, no technical demonstration, the melodies are sparse and yet subtle. My first contact with this album took place on youtube and the first impression was disappointing. But the album came to the house, as if by magic, as if to demonstrate the need for me to dwell a little longer, and indeed, the first full listen, I had to seriously revise my opinion too fast . Nearly seventy minutes of music, six pieces, three more than ten minutes, Awaken twelve and seventeen Matrimandir The Daydream Suite twenty-four minutes. Here is an impressive technical. then there is a very high quality recording, which offers a magnificent return of all instruments, a feast for the ears. Finally, there is the music itself, which indeed might surprise you to first listen by its apparent simplicity for a genre like progressive and yet should quickly captivate you. 
Simplicity is not the right word, because there are a multitude of breaks, change of pace, instrumentals, but there never will be breezy technical performance rather beaches where a low point on the front left some notes to guitar and keyboard keys. Writing is sometimes repetitive but fly, especially when the sound quality is the rendezvous. There are many reasons to own Genesis plus some forays into jazz. The mixture is clever and happy. singing seems almost always to the limit but it never crossed the border, always fair and square, nice enough in the end, not only against some live by it is the height but that is another matter. Talking songs now. This is the voice of Lorenzo starts the album Awaken. A rhythmic prog vintage, a piano break, a long range battery bass guitar blues rock where the keyboard a few small patches, rather repetitive but delicious, the kind of thing you do not really expect an album of progressive rock and makes fly. The title ends with an air of Genesis in the early years which makes it even more awesome, a really beautiful piece. Cup Lady is a small intimate ballad between two giants. Lorenzo's voice is fly, simple music with choirs, magic, the pause was needed to tackle PiGreo. because then we will go in all directions, the prog to jazz, rhythm changes chaining unceremoniously. 
It is for me the best track on the album that shows how Zenit control the mixing of genres, from classical to prog blues jazz, a beautiful guitar sound to listen very hard sax that Stephano Zaccagni is invited into the group. This is excellent. Matrimandir and Hindu influences is probably a little surprise the audience. The title goes slowly, tirelessly repeating the same mantra among whom the guitar shines from time to time and a passage where Brazilian music beautifully encrusted. Again the bass is put forward on a long passage with jazzy keyboards, almost a trademark of the Swiss group. A great opportunity to listen briefly also the drummer makes beautiful things. Seventeen minutes relatively peaceful passing pleasantly. 's instrumental album is Plusar almost six minutes to progressive wish that begin and end quite unexpectedly see. Zenit's music still shows its The limits on Daydream Suite. For such a period, more than twenty four minutes anyway, there is no doubt dazzling solos to boost the title. A beautiful discovery that this album, mixing classic prog, jazz and blues, with a low forward and good musicians even if they do not play in the short demonstratives, excellent sound bill. Although the last title left me a bit unsatisfied, it is interesting to discover a disk. Posted by Neoprog on 11/03/2013

http://www.neoprog.eu/critique/zenit/the_chandrasekhar_limit

CURRENTLY AVAILABLE AT GONZO
The Chandrasekhar Limit
CD - £9.99

 Review: SOMEONE ELSE LIKES ZENIT AS MUCH AS I DO


 

frontThe Zenit  are from Switzerland (Canton Ticino) and have to their credit already three outputs, this is the most recent title  The Chandrasekhar Limit , issued by  Galileo Records. The Swiss band sees its ranks two "old friends" for lovers of  new prog namely  Andy Thommen  (bass) and  Ivo Bernasconi (keyboards), respectively member and "tourer" of  Clepsydra .
An interesting group in which to tell the truth had gone missing after the publication of the second episode, Surrender , that date now 2006.
It 'was therefore a pleasant surprise to find the quintet still active in the gap and tell you now that  The Chandrasekhar Limit  is an album successful and pleasant, very well played and which can not fail to make inroads into the hearts of lovers of progressive symphonic, full of guitar solos and refined and powerful carpet of keyboards. But the technical background / sound of Zenit does not end here because it can count on another distinctive feature, namely that represented by a rhythm very dynamic, well, sometimes capable of encroaching almost within fusion. The painstaking work done by Thommen and  Gabriele Schira  (drums) very often, as well as serve as a lintel, is able to go much further, much coloring the sound of the band, the guitar  Luigi Biamino  and the voice of  Lorenzo Sonognini  dealing with melodies draw incurred in the phrasing keyboards quite impressive.
Moving on to describe  The Chandrasekhar Limit , for those unfamiliar with the sound of Zenit, I can try to summarize in this way: a mix of reflections belonging to 'epic  Marillion, IQ  on one side and a sound more dynamic and incisive that reminds  Spock's Beard  from another. But that's not all ...
In fact, starting from the listening 'introductory  Awaken, there are few surprises: the first part sun and symphonic music, which soon highlight the item  and Sonognini down (fantasy) Thommen, serves as preparation for a second in which the guitar rises to the role of the protagonist, dragging the piece to an atmosphere very close to  Pink Floyd .In this work also contributes bass and drums, hypnotic and repetitive. The sound of 'organ in the background closes the circle, before gentle and elegant piano notes introduce the concluding part, dreamy and again with an eye to the English prog 80s.
With the accompaniment of an acoustic guitar Sonognini opens  Cub Lady , short and delicate acoustic picture.
PiGreco  emphasizes the good qualities of the vocalist on a track that initially offers some distinct reminder to sounds Gentle Giant , and again is the guitar, distorted and full of effects, to change the scenario of the song to bring it back to the atmosphere warmer, hot and long with notes . The final part takes up and develops the opening theme with the inclusion of the saxophone played by  Stephen Zaccagni .
Distant sounds of India and a text in Sanskrit, that is how  Matrimandir ; between notes of sitar and other ethnic sounds kicks off a theme that is halfway between the progressive and a foray into fusion thanks to the electric piano, a guitar and a clean drumming gentle and effective. An arpeggio acoustics halfway through the song, and with it goes the singing in English, the mood becomes much more progressive and are to appreciate the choirs of Thommen and Biamino; nice the only final of the six strings.
It 's also a track entirely instrumental,  Pulsar . Again the band is able to implement the merger between prog and jazzy with taste and apparent ease. Perhaps more than any other song that leaves no room for technique and in this connection I want to emphasize the good work hides and skins of Gabriele Schira.
With its 24 minutes, the suite  The Daydream Suite  completes the work, however, is quite large (about 70 minutes). Significant deployment of female backing vocals, arrangements substantial, important solo parts for keyboards, all ingredients must for any prog suite worthy of the name. The singer also denotes a certain predisposition towards the part relating to the interpretation, the emotion of the song, and the plan makes the lion's share after the introductory segment, dictating the melody and rhythm. Then it's on bass, with crisp lines, capturing the song in an alternative way. The end is what I prefer, made of very beautiful and exciting moments.
The suite, in my opinion, however, become labyrinthine in its evolution, and I believe that greater brevity would certainly have helped. That said the Zenit have returned with a good job, able to make happy the fans of the new prog is the trend more symphonic than the more rhythmic and complex. Awaken and Matrimandir are two fine examples.
Read on...

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The Chandrasekhar Limit
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