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The Green Violinist - More Thrill and Never Ending Blessings (CD)

Genre: Prog/ambient
Release Date: 28th January 2013

Label: Galileo Records
Catalogue Number: GLR111CD
Price: £9.99
Available: 8 in stock


The Green Violinist - More Thrill and Never Ending Blessings

Can you hear the elves in the wood or can you even see them? The Green Violinist start their new album More Thrill And Never-ending Blessings, dreamy, playfully and like in a fairytale. From there, the music goes on quietly flowing and full of wonderful harmonies. The songs will catch your attention.

Vincent Dufresne, leader and songwriter of the band, admits he was inspired by the painting of famous artist Marc Chagall, The Green Violinist. He managed to catch the spirit of the picture in an incredible way and to transfer it into the music.

The result is a wonderful collection of neo-prog songs containing its fair share of acoustic moments (guitar, piano and obviously violins). But the range goes further including electronic, almost trance-like songs that take you into another world. 


Tracks:
Disc 1
1. The Great Scapegoat Seeking
2. Velvet Road
3. Shy People
4. Do Worry Be Sad
5. Human Connection
6. Any Words You Say Won't Be Enough
7. Bad Inheritance (A Song To Cure)

 



 Review: ISRAELI REVIEW OF THE GREEN VIOLINIST


Life-affirming paean to the meek and weak who must be heard.
Admiring a Chagall masterpiece is a great way to get rid of depression, and Vincent Dufresne, who adopted the painting’s title for his project, know this only too well. Momentarily feeling alive, the Belgian also resolved to become a voice for the people who can’t speak for themselves.
“This world is made for winners, and we are not that kind”, goes the 13-minute drama of “Do Worry Be Sad” bemoaning the “family hell” as it gains the REM momentum and subsides to a slow techno with a delicate acoustic thread, although there can’t be a heavier start to an album than “The Great Scapegoat Seeking”, a dirge for the Holocaust victims. With no klezmer fiddle in sight, but with pealing bells and Eastern drone wrapped around pounding riffs that give way to Dufresne’s solemn voice and keyboards, the piece possesses a grave gravitas to suck one in, yet its organ coda throws a bridge to the upbeat, if not merry, country rock of “Shy People” to change the sad tack for a hopeful roll.
The piano-stricken “Human Connection” reveals the Drake-Buckley influence on Dufresne, but Vincent applies his own tremulous emotions to the likes of “Velvet Road”, lighter in its strumming and electronic percussion, and growing into an intense, while quite transparent, hymn. The scope takes further unfurling in the orchestral panorama, which creates a cinematic backdrop for “Any Words You Say Won’t Be Enough”, where distorted vocals are smoothed with a guitar flight, but “Bad Inheritance (A Song To Cure)” binds the loose ends – reggae breaks, spoken word, massive choir, rocking sway – into an arresting finale. As shoegazing is banished from here, blessed are these thrills.
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 Review: THE GREEN VIOLINIST REVIEW



http://www.dangerdog.com/2013-music-reviews/the-green-violinist-more-thrill-and-never-ending-blessing.php#.UYwnNrXEopc

The Green Violinist More Thrill & Never Ending Blessing ReviewTHE GREEN VIOLINIST MORE THRILL & NEVER ENDING ...The Green Violinist: More Thrill & Never Ending Blessing
Melodic Progressive Rock
3.5/5.0
Website (Label)
Galileo Records
by Craig Hartranft,  05.09.2013

Taking inspiration from the Marc Chagall painting of the same name, composer, guitarist, keyboard player Vincent Dufresne (ex-Sioban) created The Green Violinist to explore a fresh musical direction. His explorations can be found in the debut release More Thrill & Never Ending Blessing.
Green Violinist Band Photo

With one pass through the album, two impressions come to mind. First, as a vocalist, Dufresne sounds like a young Greg Lake. Second, the atmosphere of many of the songs, maybe across the entire recording, reminds of The Moody Blues. Much of this comes from the ethereal, airy, feel created by the combination of piano, synths and acoustic guitar. It also has the additional effect of making the album feel moody (no pun intended), melancholic, and sad.

Some of this emotion comes from the themes explored. Dufresne explains: "to give the right to speak to those who are never allowed to get a word in edgewise (sic) … the weak ones, the scapegoats, the shy people, the gentle ones, the mourning people, the maladjusted ones, the society's rejects, the desperate lovers… every song is an hymn to those pariahs and are dedicated to us all (an interesting reference to himself)." If you follow that then you will get the songs, or at least the titles, like Shy People and Any Words You Say Won't Be Enough.

Then there's Do Worry Be Sad, which is The Green Violinist's most intricate and expressive song and perhaps the most depressing, emotionally. Don't play this for Bobby McFerrin. Also, there's the curious The Great Scapegoat Seeking which is lyrically obtuse and nonsensical (who are the worldf**ckers, anyway?), but musically, one of best arrangements of delight melodic rock on the album. The female background vocals from Emilie Laclais reminds of Stevie Nicks.

The Green Violinist's More Thrill & Never Ending Blessing is a curious, but entertaining, album of melodic progressive rock, where the music trumps the mildly depressing lyrical themes.

Listen: The Green Violinist - More Thrill & Never Ending Blessing

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More Thrill and Never Ending Blessings
CD - £9.99

 

 Review: REVIEW: The Green Violinist


 


Taking inspiration from the Marc Chagall painting of the same name, composer, guitarist, keyboard player Vincent Dufresne (ex-Sioban) created The Green Violinist to explore a fresh musical direction. His explorations can be found in the debut release More Thrill & Never Ending Blessing.
Green Violinist Band Photo
Green Violinist: founder, Vincent Dufresne
With one pass through the album, two impressions come to mind. First, as a vocalist, Dufresne sounds like a young Greg Lake. Second, the atmosphere of many of the songs, maybe across the entire recording, reminds of The Moody Blues. Much of this comes from the ethereal, airy, feel created by the combination of piano, synths and acoustic guitar. It also has the additional effect of making the album feel moody (no pun intended), melancholic, and sad.
Some of this emotion comes from the themes explored. Dufresne explains: "to give the right to speak to those who are never allowed to get a word in edgewise (sic) … the weak ones, the scapegoats, the shy people, the gentle ones, the mourning people, the maladjusted ones, the society's rejects, the desperate lovers… every song is an hymn to those pariahs and are dedicated to us all (an interesting reference to himself)." If you follow that then you will get the songs, or at least the titles, like Shy People and Any Words You Say Won't Be Enough.
Then there's Do Worry Be Sad, which is The Green Violinist's most intricate and expressive song and perhaps the most depressing, emotionally. Don't play this for Bobby McFerrin. Also, there's the curious The Great Scapegoat Seeking which is lyrically obtuse and nonsensical (who are the worldf**ckers, anyway?), but musically, one of best arrangements of delight melodic rock on the album. The female background vocals from Emilie Laclais reminds of Stevie Nicks.
The Green Violinist's More Thrill & Never Ending Blessing is a curious, but entertaining, album of melodic progressive rock, where the music trumps the mildly depressing lyrical themes.

Listen: The Green Violinist - More Thrill & Never Ending Blessing

 Review: THE GREEN VIOLINIST: All about Jazz


 

The Green Violinist: More Thrill & Never Ending Blessings (2013)

By 
Published: April 29, 2013

The Green Violinist: More Thrill & Never Ending Blessings

This Belgian progressive-rock outfit's debut frames its moniker on the title of artist Marc Chagall's The Green Violinist. Lead vocalist Vincent Dufresne derived inspiration from the painting after wading through some personal issues in 2003. The artist states that upon hearing the Canadian punk/post-rock band Silver Mount Zion's "13 Angels Standing Guard 'Round the Side of Your Bed," coupled with his initial viewing of the Chagall piece, ..."created a moment of pure delight." Otherwise, many of these works are built on medium-tempo and thrusting progressive-rock stylizations, although some of the lyricism intimates a good deal of lament, paralleling life's unfortunate circumstances.
Dufresne's vocal delivery is a tad reminiscent of Greg Lake's majestic and profound singing during his stint with the original, 1969 King Crimson lineup. Otherwise, this ensemble projects a big sound, partially set within emphatic prog-rock balladry atop steady and blossoming grooves amid a few thorny time signatures and harmonious themes. On "Velvet Road," the band uncannily entwines a vintage folk, protest song type aura via Dufresne's resonating and purposeful vocalizations to complement other regions of sound, where souped-up electric-folk sensibilities delicately underscore the weightier moments.
At times the ensemble bridges a psychedelic aura into the schematics, tinted with catchy riffs and ethereal, space-rock applications. Through it all, the musicians maintain a distinct group persona, enamored by the vocalist's commanding musical presence. However, many of the assumed influences and treatments partly emanate from an imaginative stance and may not be directly related to the artists' intent.
"Human Connection" contains a retro acoustic-electric folk narrative, treated with effects. Whereas, "Bad Inheritance (A Song to Cure)" is a slow-tempo regal rocker, featuring spoken word and what appears to be spacey synth treatments or perhaps drummer Gabriel Peeters' programming mechanisms. Ultimately, this unit morphs a prolific artistic element into its scope. In a certain way, listening to this album is akin to experiencing déjà vu, yet it's wholly evident that the musicians morph the old and the new into an idiosyncratic approach.
Track Listing: The Great Scapegoat Seeking; Velvet Road; Shy People; Do Worry Be Sad; Human Connection; Any Words You Say Won't Be Enough; Bad Inheritance (A Song To Cure).
Personnel: Vincent Dufresne: vocals and acoustic guitar; Regis Planque: bass; Gabriel Peeters: drums, electronic drums & programming; Raphael Bresler: electric guitar; Emilie Laclais: backing vocals; Mathieu Vandermolen: electric guitar.
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 Review: THE GREEN VIOLINIST REVIEWED


 

http://shakefire.com/review/the-green-violinist-more-thrill-never-ending-blessings
Inspired by Mark Chagall’s painting of the same name, The Green Violinist is a project from musician Vincent Dufresne (Sioban) that was created from depression and frustration. Dufresne wanted to make a concept album that spoke for the voiceless and gave hope to the hopeless. The result is this unconventional album that has traces of familiarity but passion all its own.
More Thrill & Never-ending Bliss is an album that defies categorization. At one point I had assumed I had just thrown on a contemporary rock album, then an album immersed in Americana, only to be thrown for a loop when an electronic heart began to beat at the center of yet another diverse track. At times like this, as a music critic, you just have to throw the rule book out the window and allow the music to guide you to whatever destination it has planned.
Each song is enveloped by some emotional direction. The Great Scapegoat Seeking is about frustration and anger. A nod to the disenfranchised who remain powerless in the face of the larger more powerful entities who commit the sins but lay the blame on the ones beneath them. It is protest and it is a call to arms.
Velvet Road is a sad tune that is reminiscent of the grunge era (think Alice In Chains) and plays poetically on it’s message. Then it is followed by a kind of upbeat tune that brings us back to the mid-80’s. A surprising turn no doubt, but with its own charm.
Don’t Worry, Be Sad. Is it a nod to the Bobby McFarlane tune Don’t Worry Be Happy? A more realistic view point for those that understand happiness and depression are not controlled by a switch that can easily be flipped with positive reinforcement?
I was pretty impressed with the album. It doesn’t just rest on one type of sound. Instead it shapes its lyrical with a soundtrack that heightens the messages found within. From the symphonic blast of Any Words You Say Won’t Be Enough, to the hellish undertones of anguish laying beneath the music on Scapegoat. It’s a sure sign that the album was a passion project instead of simply another album being force fed into the mainstream. Kudos for that. If you enjoy stepping off the beaten track every once in awhile I highly suggest. 
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 Review: THE GREEN VIOLINIST: Belgian review


http://www.progopinion.blogspot.com/

What a week ... CD 

Green Violinist - More Thrill ... (2013 


musical and emotional tour de force ...


... the Belgian band Green Violinist Vincent Defresne with this debut album 'More Thrill & NeverEnding Blessings' delivered. It is long since I am so touched by a new album, but in this case there is a "peak experience" in many respects. Defresne has his personal depression, the way he has withdrawn from them and the impact it painting 'The Green Violinist "Chagall had thereon, as' input' seen for this album. A work that the weakest among us, or those who, like Defresne, temporarily seated in a vulnerable situation, hope and help should offer. What pompous but the data is in neo-progressive music with symphonic influences you in the heart. Strongly singing Defresne and well-oiled band lay in the seven impressive tracks sound carpets, melodies and arrangements drop you into a trance. Example through the powerful opener "The Great Scapegoat Seeking 'or the end of a sort repetitive ambient music' resultant 'Do not Worry Be Sad." Music with a soul. And that is ultimately to music: emotion. Magnificent! Harry de Vries (what a week 13)


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More Thrill and Never Ending Blessings
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 Review: THE GREEN VIOLINIST: Belgian review



Photohttp://www.keysandchords.com/6/post/2013/04/green-violinist-more-thrill-never-ending-blessings.html 

Green Violinist: More Thrill & Never Ending Blessings 03/04/2013

A Belgian debut album, we are always to be found. Already in 2003 inspired frontman Vincent Defresne on a painting by the Russian Jewish artist Marc Chagall, "the green violinist" and he decided that this would be the name of his future music project.Defresne played then by Siobhan but when he threw the towel in the ring, he could start with "The Green Violinst". Therefore he called on bassist Regis Planque (also ex-Siobhan) and drummer Gabriel Peeters. The album opens immediately very sharply with 'The Great Seeking Scapegoat'. You hear oriental sounds between the heavy guitars and keyboards and then the number to calmer waters tacks. Defresne has a beautiful voice that therefore fully finished and handsome supported by the guitar work of Mathieu Vandermolen and Raphael Bresler. Even the backing vocals of Emilie Laclais we over flavors, they are simply exquisite.

From the opener is clear that the group is inspired by the best symphonic rock and progressive rock. The compositions are patiently and many layered structure. A fortune is that they have their own recording studio, Jedinakow in Fontenoy, disposal. "Velvet Road" begins with a remarkable acoustic guitar (à la Ojos de Brujo) to the melodious voice of Vincent Defresne back totally free to give way. The first half of this rather melancholy and subdued song is only through voice, bass drum, acoustic guitar and sparse keyboards worn and the result is breathtaking. Can we in between these guys also complement their excellent English, both in writing the lyrics and singing them. The elegant and up-tempo "Shy People" is driven by a beautiful organ. I think a song on the radio very well would. The pièce de résistance on this disc is less than 13 minutes' Do not Worry Be Sad ". No cheerful song, because very far from tormented and dark but with verve charged. Especially the instrumental passages between the sung portions of this song witnesses of great class.In their words of thanks in the liner notes are Marillon and Barclay James Harvest thanks (Nick Drake indeed).Not unjustly because they make music in that tradition without blindly copying. Also 'Human Connection' is a very dark and depressing composition, but it does produce beautiful music.

It is clear that Desfresne lot of understanding and sympathy can muster for the outcasts of society for whom survival is not so simple. "Any Words You Say Will not Be Enough" is dedicated to Hélène De Deken a girl who died at the age of 15. It's pretty chilling at the hands of the lived Desfresne vocals and beautiful piano and guitar. The album ends with "Bad Inheritance (A Song To Cure) where multiple vocals and piano song colorize and where the instruments just very lightly with funk and reggae flirting and then make room for a choir. Conclusion: an excellent and varied plate. I am wondering if the successor is going to be so dark colored. Peter Desmet (3 ½)

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More Thrill and Never Ending Blessings
CD - £9.99

 Review: ITALIAN REVIEW OF THE GREEN VIOLINIST


front

Continuing to explore new proposals I came across this band from Belgium, led by singer and keyboardist  Vincent Dufresne, the album in question is titled   More Thrill and Never Ending Blessing.

The group's name is clearly inspired by the homonymous painting by Marc Chagall through which Dufresne tried to translate it into notes the deep feelings derived.Few fragmentary news available on the group, however, consists of six elements, in addition to the aforementioned front man are part of   P Rex  (bass),  Gabriel Peeters(drums) , Emilie Laclais  (backing vocals),  Raphael Bresler  and  Mathieu Vandermolen  ( guitars). L 'album was released by  Galileo Records.

Wanting to give a cognitive reference, a point of departure, this can not be simply represented by a name: Anathema.The sound of the Belgians it runs intuitively to that of  Cavanagh & Co. while denoting did not want to renounce to highlight their insights.The mood that often emerges from the songs, the timbre of Dufresne and in any case the use of vocals and choirs, often nostalgic atmosphere enriched with arrangements of strings, the use of electronic sounds and a touch of psychedelia make  The Green Violinist  certainly a group derivative but in the positive sense of the term.Their music is undoubtedly a progressive good profile, pretty straightforward and based on emotions, there are amazing technical performance, style exercises but a sound system directly as nice and polite.Dark soundscapes flow in listening to this album, colors and shades make their appearance in the middle of a sound shrouded in a misty solitude, the voice of Vincent Dufresne, sometimes solemn, sometimes almost sorrowful, is the glue between all seven songs included in the CD.

And 'no doubt music to images, as in the case dell'introduttiva  The Great Seeking Scapegoat ; around the singer, always on top, stretching more melodic themes cross each other and supported by a strong contribution of the arches. Appears now that aura of melancholy that will be distinctive in all the work so as to detect even the nice exchange between the voices of Emilie Dufresne and Laclais.The acoustic guitar accompanies the front man in the following  Velvet Road  that, if possible, accentuates the nostalgic and ethereal sound of the group. In these first two steps (will not be the only ones), the similarities with the  Anathema which I mentioned above are pretty obvious but it is still mere emulation.  The Green Violinist manage to infuse their music customization, something difficult to define, perhaps most elusive but perceptible.

Now completely stand-alone is certainly  Shy People  that song apart, like a piece of  REM Given that I have always appreciated the American band escapes me the way, the link (from a musical point of view) of this song entirely outside from the context. Taken in itself is pleasant but returns me the impression of a shot in the dark, it is at least unusual.

After this unexpected "obstacle" is again a bell 'guitar arpeggio to open  Do Worry Be Sad  that brings the puck towards the levels of previous pathos. In this case, the Belgian dare a mini suite 13 minutes abundant in which there is an increase in tension, emotional, a "mount" progressive dramatization which also contribute to the use of electronic sounds programmed, not the battery. Not a few psychedelic mixed type input to a 'aura ambient background.

Human Connection  outlines a scenario cold and sad, cold and distressed; plan overlaps with a repetitive guitar arpeggio, games and inlays of items that disrupt one of Dufresne in a ballad sad and depressing.

Any Words You Say Will not Be Enough  is crossed by a greater pace but retains, especially in the timbre of the singer, the usual melancholy vein. Great use of violins for a major exhibition and a short guitar solo distinguish the song.

The weir is entrusted to  Bad Inheritance (A Song To Cure)  that manages to combine the two main aspects, namely the painful and restless with the rhythm. The plan is always in the front row to draw the line to follow and thanks to an excellent arrangement of the song is channeled towards an almost epic final.There are likely to improve and refine some aspects but the plant of  The Green Violinist  in my opinion is valid: repackage a disc of a new prog  quite marked, with clear references to psychedelia and electronics, but always kept in a leaden bed. Work smart and nice, very winter.

Read on...

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